Help the Animals and Pets of Ukraine

IFAW Ukraine Animal Assistance

IFAW's goal is to help where we are needed most and to keep families together as they flee Ukraine in search of safety. In the coming weeks and months, families, including their pets, fleeing Ukraine will need each other more than ever.  Learn more

IFAW Ukraine Animal Assistance  IFAW's goal is to help where we are needed most and to keep families together as they flee Ukraine in search of safety. In the coming weeks and months, families, including their pets, fleeing Ukraine will need each other more than ever.  Learn more

The Animal Welfare Institute is committed to using our donors’ contributions for the direct benefit of animals. Because of our fiscal responsibility and transparency, AWI has been awarded an A+ rating by CharityWatch and a 4-star rating by Charity Navigator.

AWI has initially distributed nearly $25,000 to multiple organizations in Ukraine and neighboring countries that run or support private and public shelters, veterinary clinics, zoos, and rescue and rehabilitation centers providing desperately needed care.  Learn more about the organizations we have funded to help the animals of Ukraine. 

Make a donation to AWI here

How the War is Affecting Animals and Pets in Ukraine

Nastia From Irpin Who Fearlessly Rescued Disabled Dogs In War Zone
A Western journalist took a photo that made her famous. "You can see the full range of the human experience in Irpin. I heard reports of Russian tanks shooting indiscriminately [...] In this atmosphere of fear, a woman emerges and she is bringing disabled dogs from a shelter to safety," said the report.

Later, Ukrainian journalists were able to find this 20-year-old hero, Nastia. "I am not a volunteer, I just take care of dogs," she said. Nastia and the dogs are now in safety, and others are helping to place the rescued dogs in new homes.

You can learn more about Nastia and make a donation for her dogs here:

Washington Post: Kyiv Zoo Director Kyrylo Trantin comforts Horace, a 17 year-old Asian elephant, at the Kiev Zoo in Kyiv, Ukraine, on March 4. (Heidi Levine)
A blast-stressed elephant and an abandoned lemur: The war within Kyiv’s zoo

By the Washington Post Siobhán O'Grady and Kostiantyn Khudov

 KYIV, Ukraine — Horace the Asian elephant is so terrified of explosions that he’s been put on sedatives. The zebras are being kept inside after they panicked at the sound of shelling and ran directly into a fence. And Maya the lemur is so overwhelmed that she abandoned her newborn baby this week — nearly killing him.

Zoos have often been collateral damage in war around the world. And war is now touching Kyiv’s zoo, next to a key military installation and possibly in the path of a Russian push into the capital.

Read the article